We Do Not Lose Heart (The Father of Mercies #4)

/Get the Sermons Automatically

When so much of the world seems to co-opt the message of Jesus for their own mutually exclusive purposes, some of which are blatantly violent and evil, how do we know what His message really is? One way is to pay close attention to what the New Testament, written by those who were closest to Jesus, actually says.

This week we were in 2 Corinthians 4, and we saw that the gospel Paul preached is very different from what we might expect. It's a paradoxical gospel where life comes through death. But this gospel is beautiful and good and heart-warming and soul-filling and humanity-transforming—because it's this gospel that actually describes who Jesus is and what He's done, this gospel that actually reconnects us to the Father of mercies and God of all comfort.

When so much of the world seems to co-opt the message of Jesus for their own mutually exclusive purposes, some of which are blatantly violent and evil, how do we know what His message really is? One way is to pay close attention to what the New Testament, written by those who were closest to Jesus, actually says.

This week we were in 2 Corinthians 4, and we saw that the gospel Paul preached is very different from what we might expect. It's a paradoxical gospel where life comes through death. But this gospel is beautiful and good and heart-warming and soul-filling and humanity-transforming—because it's this gospel that actually describes who Jesus is and what He's done, this gospel that actually reconnects us to the Father of mercies and God of all comfort.